Is Buying Reviews an Ethical Business Practice?

Is Buying Reviews an Ethical Business Practice?

As soon as you say something like “Ethics,” I get ready for a lecture on morality and religion. That’s not the point of this article. But I will give you a sliding scale and you can impose your own sense of ethics and morality to determine which end of the scale you are comfortable with. I’m pretty sure that ethics is a sliding scale influenced by Risk, Reward and Motivation.

· Risk = Possible punishment

Prize = Gift size

Motivation = emotional drive that comes from positive or negative circumstances.

For example, if you asked most people if they would eat food from the trash, most would say “No.” However, as your hunger mounts and your options for something better subside, your willingness to partake in the trash can dining experience will grow.

When it comes to reviews, there is the obvious question of what reviews will do for me. AKDSEO merupakan agency digital marketing yang fokus melayani jasa Backlinks dan Link building website, termasuk di dalamnya Jasa Menaikkan DA ( Domain Authority), I believe there are four main benefits of reviews:

1. An ego booster for business owners. “They like me!, They like me so much!”

2. A social signal to search engines that people are engaged with your company. This tends to affect rankings to a small degree.

3. Visual indicators that make your business listing stand out. Reed Manning, Spa & Salon In the Google listing example, 5 yellow stars appear after you get 5 reviews and that makes your map listing more visible and more likely to get a click or call.

4. Positive affirmation to your new prospects that others find what you provide valuable.

Obviously, these four are the main factors of interest. 60% of online shoppers look at reviews before making a decision. See the link at the bottom.

Most business owners already know this. So, reviews are something business owners want. However, I’ve seen a lot of confusion about where reviews should be placed and how much value and weight they carry. The main value is based on the credibility of potential customers and possibly search engines. This is where most reviews end and the value they bring.

Company Website: Written Review – This type of review is weightless with search engines and very little credibility with potential customers because everyone knows you control the website and you can put whatever you want regardless of the truth of the statement or if the customer is the only one . who is real or not.

· Company Website: Video Reviews – This gives more weight to your potential customers because people can see that it is a real person and not just a creation of your imagination. They still don’t know if this person is really your customer or just a good friend who owes you something, but it looks more realistic. Often this type of review is good for a specific product page or a page that discusses the services you provide.

· Google Plus: This tends to cost potential customers more because they know you can’t remove bad reviews and it’s a little harder to fake reviews.

Yelp: These tend to be more weighty than Google reviews because it’s harder to fake these reviews and you can’t remove bad reviews from these forums. This review platform also brings a lot of credibility with Google. Yelp has a loyal following and there are more people using it than a search engine.

· Facebook: It is good to have stars and reviews written on Facebook because there are loyal Facebook followers which gives this platform credibility. While you can’t remove bad reviews from Facebook, it’s not a well-known fact.

· Yellow Pages or Dex: It’s good to have at least one review on this platform as it tends to affect a group of people who like to use this search tool.

· Other places you may want to review include: Citysearch, Manta, Superpages, Kudzu, Best of the Web, and Better Business Bureau. If you can get a review on Angie’s list, it’s pretty solid because it’s nearly impossible to fake.

Now that you know the value of a review and where to place it, it’s time to answer the original question of do you have to “pay” for the review?

Is Buying Reviews an Ethical Business Practice?

As soon as you say something like “Ethics,” I get ready for a lecture on morality and religion. That’s not the point of this article. But I will give you a sliding scale and you can impose your own sense of ethics and morality to determine which end of the scale is comfortable for you. I’m pretty sure that ethics is a sliding scale influenced by Risk, Reward and Motivation.

· Risk = Possible punishment

Prize = Gift size

Motivation = emotional drive that comes from positive or negative circumstances.

For example, if you asked most people if they would eat food from the trash, most would say “No.” However, as your hunger mounts and your options for something better subside, your willingness to partake in the trash can dining experience will grow.

When it comes to reviews, there is the obvious question of what reviews will do for me. I believe there are four main benefits of reviews:

1. An ego booster for business owners. “They like me!, They like me so much!”

2. A social signal to search engines that people are engaged with your company. This tends to affect rankings to a small degree.

3. Visual indicators that make your business listing stand out. In the Google listing example, 5 yellow stars appear after you get 5 reviews and that makes your map listing more visible and more likely to get a click or call.

4. Positive affirmation to your new prospects that others find what you provide valuable.

Obviously, these four are the main factors of interest. 60% of online shoppers look at reviews before making a decision. See the link at the bottom.

Most business owners already know this. So, reviews are something business owners want. However, I’ve seen a lot of confusion about where reviews should be placed and how much value and weight they carry. The main value is based on the credibility of potential customers and possibly search engines. This is where most reviews end and the value they bring.

Company Website: Written Reviews – This type of review is weightless with search engines and very little credibility with potential customers because everyone knows you control the website and you can put whatever you want regardless of the truth of the statement or if the customer is the only one one by one . who is real or not.

· Company Website: Video Reviews – This gives more weight to your potential customers because people can see that it is a real person and not just a creation of your imagination. They still don’t know if this person is really your customer or just a good friend who owes you something, but it looks more realistic. Often this type of review is good for a specific product page or a page that discusses the services you provide.

· Google Plus: This tends to cost potential customers more because they know you can’t remove bad reviews and it’s a little harder to fake reviews.

Yelp: These tend to be more weighty than Google reviews because it’s harder to fake these reviews and you can’t remove bad reviews from these forums. This review platform also brings a lot of credibility with Google. Yelp has a loyal following and there are more people using it than a search engine.

· Facebook: It is good to have stars and reviews written on Facebook because there are loyal Facebook followers which gives this platform credibility. While you can’t remove bad reviews from Facebook, it’s not a well-known fact.

· Yellow Pages or Dex: It’s good to have at least one review on this platform as it tends to affect a group of people who like to use this search tool.

· Other places you may want to review include: Citysearch, Manta, Superpages, Kudzu, Best of the Web, and Better Business Bureau. If you can get a review on Angie’s list, it’s pretty solid because it’s nearly impossible to fake.

Now that you know the value of a review and where to place it, it’s time to answer the original question of do you have to “pay” for the review?